Eating Late May Wreak Havoc On Your Body
Greg Richter, 19 Jun 17
       

(Credit: Pexels)

Eating late at night could be worse for your health than you might think.

Compared to eating earlier in the day, prolonged delayed eating can increase weight, insulin, and cholesterol levels, and negatively affect fat metabolism, and hormonal markers implicated in heart disease, diabetes, and other health problems, according to new research.

The findings offer the first experimental evidence on the metabolic consequences of consistent delayed eating compared to daytime eating, and were presented at SLEEP 2017, the 31st Annual Meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies on Sunday.

“We know from our sleep loss studies that when you’re sleep deprived, it negatively affects weight and metabolism in part due to late-night eating, but now these early findings, which control for sleep, give a more comprehensive picture of the benefits of eating earlier in the day,” says Namni Goel, a research associate professor of psychology in psychiatry in the division of sleep and chronobiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and lead author of the ongoing study.

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