Six Things Every Consumer Should Know About The ‘Internet of Things’
Kayleen Manwaring, 19 Jun 17
       

What happens if your smart kettle is hacked? Shutterstock

At least 40% of Australian households now have at least one home “Internet of Things” device. These are fridges, window blinds, locks and other devices that are connected to the internet.

While the Internet of Things (IoT) may lead to more efficiency in our daily lives, my research shows that consumers are exposed to many risks by the use of IoT devices, ranging from disclosure of private information, to physical injury and problems with the devices themselves.

Australia has no specific laws aimed at addressing IoT issues, and current laws intended to protect consumers have gaps and uncertainties when dealing with IoT devices.

1) Your devices can spy on you (and your kids)

Many IoT device manufacturers and suppliers show little regard for customers’ privacy. Some even make money from customer data.

Consumer electronics company Vizio recently agreed to pay US regulators US$2.2 million, after allegedly failing to get appropriate consent from users to track their TV viewing habits.

Late last year, the Norwegian Consumer Council found that a children’s doll recorded anything said to it by children and sent the recordings to a US company. The company reserved the right to share and use the data for a broad range of purposes.

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