As Socialists Usurp Power in Venezuela, Trump Threatens Military Option
NTD Television, 14 Aug 17
       

President Donald Trump speaks to the press at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, NJ, on Aug. 11, 2017. (JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump indicated that he will not rule out military intervention as an option to address the growing instability in Venezuela.

Venezuela slid toward a more volatile stage of unrest in recent days, with anti-government forces looting weapons from a military base after a new socialist legislative body usurped the authority of the opposition-controlled Congress.

“The people are suffering and they are dying. We have many options for Venezuela including a possible military option if necessary,” Trump said.

The White House said Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro requested a phone call with Trump on Friday, Aug. 11, which the White House appeared to spurn, saying in a statement that Trump would gladly speak to Venezuela’s socialist leader when democracy was restored in that country.

Venezuela was one of the wealthiest countries in South America before Hugo Chávez instituted socialist reforms that devastated the country’s economy. Maduro took over from Chávez in 2013 and continued his policies with the country sliding into mass poverty and widespread hunger.

Venezuelan authorities have long said U.S. officials were planning an invasion. A former military general told Reuters earlier this year that some anti-aircraft missiles had been placed along the country’s coast for precisely that eventuality.

In Washington, the Pentagon said the U.S. military was ready to support efforts to protect U.S. citizens and America’s national interests, but that insinuations by Caracas of a planned U.S. invasion were “baseless.”

Trump’s suggestion of possible military action came in a week when he had repeatedly threatened a military response if North Korea threatens the United States or its allies.

Asked if U.S. forces would lead an operation in Venezuela, Trump declined to provide details. “We don’t talk about it but a military operation—a military option—is certainly something that we could pursue,” he said.

The U.S. military has not directly intervened in the region since a 1994-1995 operation that aimed to remove from Haiti a military government installed after a 1991 coup.

The United States sanctioned Maduro and other Venezuelan officials in July after Maduro established a constituent Assembly run by his United Socialist Party loyalists and cracked down on opposition figures. The Assembly’s election drew international condemnation and critics have said it removed any remaining checks on Maduro’s power.

Sign in to view full article

       
The Disease of Struggle
When the Soviet Union collapsed, Ryszard Legutko, the minister of education of Poland, had an impression shared by many as ...
Joshua Philipp
Mon, 23 Jan 17
Use Your Body, Not WiFi, to Transmit Secure Passwords
Sending a password or secret code over airborne radio waves like WiFi or Bluetooth means anyone can eavesdrop, including hackers.
Jennifer Langston
Fri, 6 Jan 17
Charting A Course To Government By The Crowd, For The Crowd
It is a bitter irony that politicians lament the threat to democracy posed by the internet, instead of exploiting its ...
Nils Röper
Wed, 7 Jun 17
These Three Firms Own Corporate America
A fundamental change is underway in stock market investing, and the spin-off effects are poised to dramatically impact corporate America.
Jan Fichtner, Eelke Heemskerk, Javier Garcia
Tue, 16 May 17
How Robots Can Help Us Embrace a More Human View of Disability
When dealing with the otherness of disability, the Victorians in their shame built huge out-of-sight asylums, and their legacy of ...
Thusha Rajendran
Tue, 9 May 17
An Epoch Times Survey
An Epoch Times Survey
AcuSLIM - Acupuncture Weight Loss Programme
Read about Forced Organ Harvesting
Sports Elements
Sports Elements