The Ancient Clock That Rules Our Lives – and Determines Our Health
Russell Foster, 10 Oct 17
       

Vadim Sadovski/Shutterstock

Our lives are ruled by time; we use time to tell us what to do. But the alarm clock that wakes us in the morning or the wristwatch that tells us we are late for supper are unnatural clocks. Our biology answers to a profoundly more ancient beat that probably started to tick early in the evolution of all life. 

Embedded within the genes of us, and almost all life on earth, are the instructions for a biological clock that marks the passage of around 24 hours. Biological clocks or “circadian clocks” help time our sleep patterns, alertness, mood, physical strength, blood pressure and much more. 

Under normal conditions, we experience a 24-hour pattern of light and dark, and our circadian clock uses this signal to align biological time to the day and night. The clock is then used to anticipate the differing demands of the 24-hour day and fine-tune physiology and behaviour in advance of the changing conditions. Body temperature drops, blood pressure decreases, cognitive performance drops and tiredness increases in anticipation of going to bed. While before dawn, metabolism is geared-up in anticipation of increased activity when we wake. 

A circadian clock also stops everything happening at the same time, ensuring that biological processes occur in the appropriate sequence. For cells to work properly they need the right materials in the right place at the right time. 

Thousands of genes have to be switched on and off in order and in harmony. Proteins, enzymes, fats, carbohydrates, hormones, nucleic acids and other compounds have to be absorbed, broken down, metabolised and produced in a precise time window. Energy has to be obtained and then allocated to growth, reproduction, metabolism, locomotion and cellular repair. 

All of these processes, and many others, take energy and all have to be timed to the correct time of the day. Without a clock, our biology would be in chaos. 

The pioneering research of Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young – awarded the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine earlier this week – provided our first clear understanding of how a biological clock ticks in any organism; in this case, a fruit fly.

Jeffrey Hall, Michael Rosbash and Michael Young. CHINESE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG/EPA

How the clock works

At the heart of the clock is a “negative feedback loop” which consists of the following sequence of events. The clock genes produce messages that are translated into proteins. The proteins then interact to form complexes and move from the cytoplasm of the cell into the nucleus and then inhibit their own genes. These inhibitory clock protein complexes are then broken down and the clock genes are then once more free to make more messages and fresh protein – and the cycle continues day after day.

This negative feedback loop generates a near 24-hour rhythm of protein production and degradation that drives the internal biological day.

Based on the findings of Hall, Rosbash and Young in the fruit fly, very similar clock genes were then discovered in micehumans and many other animals. So the biological clocks that “tick” in us are broadly similar to the clocks found in insects, worms, fish and birds. 

We now know that the morning and evening preferences of individuals who describe themselves as either “larks” or “owls” also appear to be related to small changes in some of these clock genes that either speed up or slow down our circadian rhythms. 

Do not disturb

An understanding of how circadian clocks work and the central role they play in our biology has led to advances in many areas, not least an appreciation that when circadian rhythms are disrupted our overall health and well-being can be severely affected. 

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