How Enzymes Direct ‘Traffic’ Inside Cells
Todd Bates, 14 Nov 17
       

(Credit: Getty Images)

Protein “motors” inside cells act like trucks on tiny cellular highways to deliver life-sustaining cargo. Researchers now know how cells deploy enzymes to place traffic control and “roadway under construction” signs along those highways.

The findings could lead to new therapies for spinal cord and nerve injuries and neurodegenerative diseases.

“To stay alive and function, every cell in our body needs to transport cargoes to the place they’re needed inside the cell, in the right amount, and at the right time,” says Robert O’Hagan, assistant research professor of genetics at Rutgers University-New Brunswick and the Human Genetics Institute of New Jersey. “So there has to be a lot of organization in how transport inside the cell is regulated, and now we know a lot more about how that happens.”

The highways inside cells are called microtubules. Proteins called kinesins and dyneins act like motors—and are essentially the cargo trucks in cells. The motor proteins drive cargo around microtubule highways.

A central question in cell biology is how intracellular transport and the highway systems are organized. How do the motor proteins know where to go and how fast they need to be?

Sign in to view full article

       
Why are We More Likely to Get Cancer as We Age?
This article is part of our series on older people’s health. It looks at the changes and processes that occur ...
Stuart Pitson
Wed, 1 Feb 17
Scientists Can Hack Sensors in Cars and Phones with a $5 Speaker
Critical sensors in lots of cars, phones, and medical devices could be vulnerable to hacks from sound waves.
Nicole Casal Moore
Fri, 17 Mar 17
How To Build a More Organic Internet (And Stand Up to Corporations)
Internet access has become such a necessary tool for participating in society that it has been declared a “human right” ...
Panayotis Antoniadis
Fri, 3 Feb 17
Organ Transplants and Scarcity, Innovation, and Politics
We all want to live a long time. And in vigorous good health while doing so.
David T. Jones
Mon, 20 Feb 17
The Stress of Sitting in Traffic Can Lead to More Crime
Society pays a heavy price for traffic. It leads to lost time, more pollution and increased spending on gasoline.
Louis-Philippe Beland, Daniel Brent
Mon, 13 Feb 17
Get your November/December 2017 issue at Kinokuniya stores today!
An Epoch Times Survey
AcuSLIM - Acupuncture Weight Loss Programme
BUCHERER
Read about Forced Organ Harvesting
Sports Elements