Culture

The Alarming and Modern Chinese Doctors Lies in Their Ethics

The Alarming Difference Between Ancient and Modern Chinese Doctors Lies in Their Ethics

How times have changed… One may wonder how the ancient land of China, which once was home to the most marvellous medical doctors, is now infamous for medical genocide in the form of forced organ harvesting. When the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) sought to destroy China’s 5,000-year-old divinely inspired culture, the consequences couldn’t have been

Bao Si smile, King You of Zhou

Dizi Gui (弟子规):Dishonesty Brings Negative Consequences

“Dizi Gui” (Standards for Being a Good Student and Child) is a traditional Chinese textbook for children that teaches children morals and proper etiquette. Dizi Gui states that when we speak, honesty is of foremost importance. Deceitful words and wild lies must never be tolerated. Success may come and go, but integrity is forever. Great

Xu Heng, a neo-Confucian scholar and imperial official of the Yuan Dynasty,

Dizi Gui (弟子规) : Being Trustworthy 

“Dizi Gui” (Standards for Being a Good Student and Child) is a traditional Chinese textbook for children that teaches children morals and proper etiquette. Chapter Four of Dizi Gui, which is titled “Be Trustworthy”, teaches us precisely how to do this in our daily lives. The first lesson is that “Before using someone else’s things,

Dizi Gui (弟子规) : The Etiquette of Entering a Room

“Dizi Gui” (Standards for Being a Good Student and Child) is a traditional Chinese textbook for children that teaches children morals and proper etiquette. In Chapter 3 of Dizi Gui, we are told that we must first ask if someone is inside a private room before entering. Before entering a room, we should also make

“A broken mirror joined together”

A Broken Mirror Joined Together (破鏡重圓)Pò Jìng Chóng Yuán

During the late Southern and Northern Dynasties (A.D. 420–581), in the state of Chen, there lived a princess named Lechang who was known for her beauty and intelligence. Attracted by his talent and knowledge, she married an official named Xu Deyan. The young couple loved each other dearly and, for a time, lived happily together.

Tang dynasty – Zhang Jiuling

Dizi Gui (弟子规) : Refusing a Gift of Gold at Midnight

In Chapter 3 of Dizi Gui, we are taught how to perform certain actions in daily life. For example, “Open curtains slowly without noise, and make turns widely without hitting corners.” We should also “hold empty containers as if they were full, and enter empty rooms as if they were occupied. ” As cryptic as

Guan Ning Cuts the Mat

Dizi Gui(弟子规): Guan Ning Cuts the Mat

Dizi Gui (Standards for Being a Good Student and Child) is a traditional Chinese textbook for children that teaches children morals and proper etiquette. Conscientiousness and focus are important when doing tasks.  Dizi Gui emphasises this lesson by saying that we should avoid doing things in a hurry, as doing things in haste will lead

Fun Time | Oil on Canvas | 50 x 90cm | 2014 (Courtesy of Huang Xiong Wen)

An Art Critique on Giant Panda Artwork

Huang Xiong Wen is a successful professional painter, famous for his paintings of human figures, animals and landscapes. He graduated in 1992 from the faculty of Fine Arts in GuangXi Normal University, majoring in oil painting. Since then, Xiong Wen has created a number of renowned master pieces. Many of his paintings have been showcased

When the audience spiritual level

From Master to Disciple: How Traditional Arts Were Taught in Ancient China

Traditional Chinese arts have been around for millennia. These rich art forms include martial arts, drama, singing, Chinese painting, calligraphy and so on. But unlike our modern education system, where knowledge is ubiquitously taught using standardised curriculums, traditional Chinese arts have been passed down within families or clans, from master to disciple. Drawing from Taoist

Every year, a new wave of university graduates enters the workforce, but many struggle to find jobs in a system that has an oversupply of university graduates. Source: ABBAS MOMANI/AFP/Getty Images

The Philosophy of Shibusawa Eiichi, Father of Japan’s Modern Economy (Part 6)

Shibusawa felt that the problem was that higher education workers were not willing to take up lower education jobs. While this desire is understandable and reasonable, one’s demands may not always fit with reality and the limitations of job supply. The father of Japan’s capitalist economy is Shibusawa Eiichi (涩泽荣一) (1840-1931), a highly respected Japanese

Source: 123RF

The Secret to Happiness: It’s Simpler Than You Think

With its winding mountain trails, silver streams, and green and gold rice terraces, the scenic Sapa Valley of Vietnam appears to be an eden. But its gorgeous scenery masks the daily struggles of the valley’s indigenous people. It is post-harvest season, and many farmers have been out of the job, searching the town for temporary

arts and culture appreciation

How Arts and Culture Appreciation Can Improve One’s Body, Soul and Mind

“Man does not live by bread alone. We do wish for the finer things in life, to appreciate beauty, love and something uplifting for the spirit,” said Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the 30th anniversary event of Lasalle College of the Arts. As a matter of fact, arts and culture not only enriches our

Taiji and Swastika main

Taiji and Swastika—The Circles Of Birth And Death

If you are familiar with the genesis of civilisation, there is a common thread of folklores depicting how gods descended onto earth, hand-carried people in the acquisition of language and civilisation, instilled the notion of divine faiths, and imparted crafts and skills to deal with the environment, amongst others. And so it seems, different gods

In the late Ming Dynasty, art often depicted Chinese literati enjoying gardens. On this dish, musicians have gathered at a pavilion.Lozenge-shaped dish, Ming Dynasty (1368–1644), dated late 16th–17th century. Rogers Fund, 1923. (The Metropolitan Museum of Art)

Conveying Inner Spirit: Figural Representations in Chinese Art

“Rendering humans is the most difficult. Next are landscapes, and after that are dogs and horses. Terraces and halls and other structures with set forms are easy by comparison,” wrote the Chinese painter Gu Kaizhi (344–406). In depicting humans, he emphasized using external forms to convey a person’s spirit, an idea that developed into a

Chinese tourists hiking on Lotus Peak which is the most revered of the Huangshan (Yellow Mountains) peaks at the park in Anhui Province. The UNESCO World Heritage Site is one of China's major tourist destinations and has been a source of inspiration to Chinese painters, writers and poets for thousands of years. (Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images)

Can You Guess the Meaning of These 15 Chinese Slangs?

Slang carries the thoughts and feelings from the youth of any culture, so of course there will be great variance between cultures for behavior and what they deem important. Below are Chinese words that are given very literal translations, partly to illustrate the relationship between the meanings of their characters, and their actual definitions. Land

Shibusawa Eiichi felt that younger generations should choose their career paths based on their passion and abilities, rather than social status.

The Philosophy of Shibusawa Eiichi, Father of Japan’s Modern Economy (Part 7)

The father of Japan’s capitalist economy is Shibusawa Eiichi (1840-1931), a highly respected Japanese industrialist. Guided by his study of Confucius’ Analects, Shibusawa brought Western capitalism to Japan, but with a core emphasis on morality and business ethics. In this series, we look at Shibusawa’s philosophy and understanding of Confucius’ teachings, which guided the creation

How Confucius’ Teachings Guided the Creation of Japan’s Modern Economy: Part 3

The father of Japan’s capitalist economy is Shibusawa Eiichi ( 1840-1931 ), a highly respected Japanese industrialist. Guided by his study of Confucius’ Analects, Shibusawa brought Western capitalism to Japan, but with a core emphasis on morality and business ethics. In Part 1 and Part 2, we learned how Shibusawa laid the foundation of Japan’s

How Confucius’ Teachings Guided the Creation of Japan’s Modern Economy: Part 2

Continued from Part 1: The father of Japan’s capitalist economy is Shibusawa Eiichi ( 1840 – 1931 ), a highly respected Japanese industrialist. Guided by his study of Confucius’ Analects, Shibusawa brought Western capitalism to Japan, but with a core emphasis on morality and business ethics. Shibusawa consolidated his life experience and ideas in his book,

Confucius Japan part 4

How Confucius’ Teachings Guided the Creation of Japan’s Modern Economy: Part 4

Continued from Part 3: The father of Japan’s capitalist economy is Shibusawa Eiichi (涩泽荣一) (1840- 1931), a highly respected Japanese industrialist. Guided by his study of Confucius’ Analects, Shibusawa brought Western capitalism to Japan, but with a core emphasis on morality and business ethics. The purpose of self-cultivation is not for oneself, but for the cities and

Japan Confucius Part 5

How Confucius’ Teachings Guided the Creation of Japan’s Modern Economy: Part 5

Continued from Part 4: The father of Japan’s capitalist economy is Shibusawa Eiichi (涩泽荣一) (1840-1931), a highly respected Japanese industrialist. Guided by his study of Confucius’ Analects, Shibusawa brought Western capitalism to Japan, but with a core emphasis on morality and business ethics. Is he not a man of complete virtue, who feels no discomposure though men

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