Germany’s Luxurious Ludwigsburg Residential Palace

Larger Than Life: Art that inspires us through the ages

The sumptuous rooms in the palace range in style, from baroque, to rococo, to neoclassical. (Ralf Cohen/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)
Share on facebook
Share
Share on twitter
Tweet
Share on whatsapp
WhatsApp

By Epoch Times Staff

As vast as it is sublime, Germany’s pastel-yellow Ludwigsburg Residential Palace was once considered the “Versailles of Swabia.” The region of Swabia, in the southwest of the country, no longer exists, but Versailles-like grandeur can still be seen throughout Ludwigsburg Palace.

The palace was commissioned in the early 18th century by the Duke of Württemberg, Eberhard Ludwig, who named the palace in his honor. (Ludwigsburg translates to Louis’s Castle in English.) Constructed over almost 30 years, the palace with its more than 450 rooms includes some of the finest Baroque, Rococo, and Classical art and architecture. 

Ludwigsburg’s Baroque craftsmen and architects were mostly trained in the Bohemian style of architecture, which gives the palace a distinctive Czech and Austrian style. But elements of Versailles are echoed in the very fabric of Ludwigsburg Palace, from the distinctive mansard (French Baroque) rooftops to its mirrored halls to its Paris-commissioned furniture. And even the town of Ludwigsburg was specifically created after the palace was built, just like Versailles.  

Achim Mende
 

The palace features several museums, including a ceramics museum, a fashion museum, the Baroque Gallery, the private apartments of Duke Carl Eugen, and an interactive museum for young visitors. (Achim Mende/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

Achim Mende
 

The palace and gardens. (Achim Mende/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

Achim Mende
 

The crown atop the gable. (Achim Mende/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

David Franck
 

The second antechamber. (The second antechamber. (David Franck/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

assembly room
 

The assembly room. (David Franck/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

Steffen Hauswirth
 

The king’s staircase in the New Corps de Logis. (Steffen Hauswirth/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

 ancestral hall
 

The ancestral hall. (Steffen Hauswirth/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

records room
 

The records room. (Arnim Weischer/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

Guenther Bayerl
 

The palace was originally intended as a hunting lodge for Duke Eberhard Ludwig. (Guenther Bayerl/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

Guenther Bayerl
 

Palace grounds in bloom. (Guenther Bayerl/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

Guenther Bayerl
 

The palace includes an interactive museum for children. (Guenther Bayerl/State Palaces and Gardens of Baden-Wuerttemberg)

Subscribe for Newsletter

Sign up to receive important news avoided by other media.

Scroll to Top