Photographer Captures Fantastical Long-Tailed Indian Paradise Flycatchers in Stunning Photo Set

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)
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By Louise Bevan

An Indian nature photographer has captured the breathtaking Indian paradise flycatcher in a series of uncanny close-up shots, showcasing the distinctive-looking bird in all its glory through the lens of an expert.

Originally from Cuttack, Odisha, award-winning photographer Gyana Mohanty now works out of Navi in Mumbai. His passion for wildlife photography is dominated by birds.

“The Indian paradise flycatcher is one of my favorite birds and I love to capture them, day in and day out,” Mohanty, 39, told The Epoch Times.

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

“In Raigad, there is a village called Kalhe with small water bodies where you can easily spot these beauties,” he explained. “One winter morning, I went with my Nikon gear to capture these beauties during sunrise, when the activity is at its peak, and I was very fortunate to notice two males on the same day.”

The male flycatchers were diving into the water to shower “in front of everyone,” Mohanty marveled. With camera in hand, he snapped a stunning sequence of the little birds perching, diving, and in flight, their signature blue-black crests and long, ribbon-like tails on full display.

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

He shared the photos on Instagram for bird lovers everywhere, amassing tens of thousands of likes.

“As the village is adjacent to a forest, the probability of capturing an Indian paradise flycatcher is very high,” Mohanty went on. “That day, we reached the place early in the morning and covered ourselves with camouflaged hides … after an hour or two, we managed to see these beauties diving into the small water bodies.

“Apart from the long tail, I love the black crown and crest on their head,” he shared.

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

Beside male flycatchers, Mohanty counted females of the same species, black-naped monarchs, orange-headed thrush, rosefinches, and scaly-breasted munias among his bird sightings that day.

The Indian paradise flycatcher is native to Asia and found almost everywhere in India; Mohanty said they are more active during winter. The medium-sized bird gets its name from its dietary preference for flying insects.

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

Sporting either a black-white or black-cinnamon plumage, this species of flycatcher prefers woodland landscapes and has a harsh call, according to eBird. Numbers are currently thriving, with their population status currently of least concern.

Mohanty, who also enjoys photographing amphibians and reptiles, shares his stunning portfolio on his Instagram page.

From the vantage point of doing what he loves, his advice to others is pure and simple: “Always chase your dreams.”

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

Epoch Times Photo
 

(Courtesy of Gyana Mohanty)

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Louise Bevan is a writer, born and raised in London, England. She covers inspiring news and human interest stories.

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